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Atomnation Podcast #009 Love Over Entropy

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The Atomnation Podcast series is a monthly curated mix by friends and like minded artists of the label. Follow us on SoundCloud and Mixcloud for updates.

After the ‘new kids on the block’ in podcast eight, the ninth installment of our series is by longtime friend and celebrated producer Love Over Entropy. He remixed Polynation on Atomnation and has released numerous weapons on labels such as microCastle, Something Happening Somewhere and Lossless. There’s much more behind this musician then you think, so we couldn’t resist to ask him a couple of questions.

Hi Michel, as both producer and teacher in music production, what would be your favourite record of the past years?
I have no idea how I could pick the number one out of all the records that made an impression on me the past years. But I can tell you what the last record was that did that: Ripperton’s remix for Kalabrese’s track ‘Is this’, which is also in my podcast. I just love how it effortlessly goes from its driving beginning to its soothing end. It all feels so musical: The sounds, the rhythms, the way the story develops. We could definitely do with a bit more storytelling in electronic dance music.

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You are active in the music scene for quite some time now. In every item about you new information pops up. Could you sum up your aliases and key events in your career?
My first release was in 2001, as Roy Cordu, on Rushhour. But it was deep electronica, instead of the sound that Rushhour later got famous for. In 2007, I started releasing more techno-oriented music as Minz. First on Ripperton’s Perspectiv, later on other labels as well. With attention for Minz slowly fading, I decided to make a fresh start as Love over Entropy in 2013, when I had the honour to do the first record of Something Happening Somewhere. This made quite an impact and the Dixon edit of my track Tonii on the follow-up EP brought me a lot of attention. Still, I believe I have all the hard work still in front of me. I think I’m in a good place at the moment: Connected to good labels and playing good gigs. But to keep it at this level, or even take it to the next level, that requires hard work, time and dedication.

We witnessed your liveset many times and seeing you play is always a lot of fun. Can you tell something to readers about your live setup?
When I designed it, I had two goals in mind: Firstly, it should work in a club context. To me, that means a compact setup and, just like a DJ, I should be able to select tracks on the spot. A live set with tracks in a fixed order has never worked for me. Technically, my setup is quite advanced and at first I thought this would be enough to throw everybody into a frenzy. But I quickly discovered this only worked for the two nerds behind the booth looking over my shoulder, not for the people on the dance floor. Most people on the dance floor usually have no clue whether artists DJ or play live. And that is OK. They should only really care about the music that’s played, not about how it is done.

The second design goal was that I didn’t want to have a computer screen on stage. And that includes touchscreens. I can almost feel my brain switch into information processing mode when I look at a screen on stage. And to me, this mode feels incompatible with my brain in performance mode. The obvious solution would be to go the all-hardware route. But I’ve done those kind of live sets in the past, and always felt it was sonically too limited for my music. As I see it, hardware setups often only work if you’ve also created the music with that hardware. My music uses a lot of special processing and sound design that makes no sense to replicate live.

So I settled on a laptop running Ableton Live, but without having to look at the screen. That way I can have the laptop almost closed and out of the way. To me, Ableton Live is an open system, especially with Max for Live. It allows me to tailor my live set to my needs, and I make small adjustments after almost every gig. To control my live set, I use a couple of well-chosen controllers, and every function in my live set has its own dedicated knob. As a result, I have developed a physical relation with my controllers, very much like an instrument. That’s also why I always set up my controllers in a specific way. Some people have noticed the concentrated way in which I do this before a gig, and I think that’s because I’m not just setting up my controllers. I’m putting together my instrument.

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Between remixing, playing live shows and teaching electronic music apprentices, do you still find time to work on new material of your own? And if yes, can you already tell us something of what we may expect in the future?
Since the beginning of this year I only teach two days a week and usually perform during the weekends. I reserve at least three full days a week to be in the studio. I use that time for all my music related activities. So it could be working on new material, making old tracks ready for release, making podcasts, looking for tracks to DJ with, diving deep into some piece of gear, adjusting my live set, and so on. As long as it’s music related. To me, creating music is very much like working out. Only when you do it regularly, you start to see results. That’s why I need those three days every week.

In September I have a compilation track coming out on Lossless and remixes for Connaisseur and Objektivity. There are also new EPs coming up on Lossless, Something Happening Somewhere and Nautilus Rising, but we still need to finalize the schedule. Which with vinyl releases is always more hassle than expected. Behind the scenes, I’m also collecting material for an album. At the moment I just have some ideas and sketches, and I’m still figuring out the direction. So it might take a while.

Podcast tracklist:
1) Intro
2) Saints de glace – Love over Entropy feat. Ripperton (Something Happening Somewhere)
3) She Hunts at Night (Clesse Remix) – Pye Corner Audio (More Than Human)
4) Is this (Ripperton Mix n Remix) – Kalabrese (Rumpelmusig)
5) ? – ? (Nautilus Rising)
6) Orissa (Pépe’s Jazz Bar Re-interpretation) – Wayward (Silver Bear Recordings)
7) Burkina – Superpitcher (Hippie Dance)
8) Love supreme (Love over Entropy remix) – Peter Pardeike (Connaisseur)
9) It’s Not Me, It’s You – 6884 (200 records)
10) Guinney – Bunús (Lossless)
11) That Is When – Mathias Schober (Lossless)
12) Underwaterfall – Bearcubs (All points)

 

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Discovery Blog 2016 Week #51

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The Discovery Blog is a weekly updated selection of music findings by Atomnation curators Applescal, Guido, J.D. Heights and Will Oirson.

Subscribe to the Discovery Blog on Spotify for weekly updates.

Aparde – Vast
Label: Lenient Tales

Dark Sky – Voim
Label: Stamp The Wax Advent Calendar (donate here)

Aera – Bibimbap
Label: Hivern Discs

Sebastian Mullaert & Mathew Jonson – Pollen 4 Life (Main Mix)
Label: Hypercolour

Suzanne Kraft – Scripted Space
Label: Melody As Truth

Hi & Saberhägen – Everything Is Good
Label: Yumé Records

David Douglas – Lucine (Alex Smoke Remix)
Label: Atomnation

Fabio Montana – Ortygia (Love Over Entropy Repatterning)
Label: microCastle

Trentemöller – Always Something Better (Tennis & Mind Against Rmx) Mark Hoffen Revisited
Label: free download here

DimDJ – Mr. Hawk
Label: Snuff Trax

Underspreche – The Lady Of The Knight
Label: Optimo Trax